Cfp: Taking care of energy infrastructures

All energy sessions here

C.7 Taking care of energy infrastructures

Loloum, Tristan, Fürst, Moritz, Bovet, Alain (Université de Lausanne)

The energy transition is often framed in terms of a technological challenge and an engineering problem, involving innovative design, efficient planning, and effective optimization of energy infrastructures and the built environment. This innovation-centric view tends to neglect the fact that ‘change’ often occurs once energy systems are already in place, through incremental adaptations, additions and enhancements. The focus on engineers, planners and designers also puts aside the many actors in charge of operating and maintaining such systems on a daily basis: grid operators, HVAC technicians, facility managers, installers, caretakers, etc.

Drawing on authors like Maria Puig de la Bellacasa (2017), Dona Haraway (2016) and Bruno Latour (2013), we argue that fixing ‘things’ and taking care of energy infrastructure implies more than maintaining their technical functioning: it means caring for the people who use them and their environments, and it requires active engagement, social skills and a sense of concern towards associations between humans and non-humans. The session therefore extends on current debates in science and technology studies and energy social science that (I) observe how classical dichotomies (e.g. between planning and operation, professionals and users, engineers and technicians, people and machines) are maintained, and sometimes contested and reconfigured; (II) investigate energy infrastructure and energy transition at the level of everyday lay and professional care-taking activities, i.e. considering energy practices as situated and culturally embedded realities rather than in terms of dominant paradigms of technological innovation and economic rationality.


This panel session invites contributors from all disciplinary horizons, looking at energy infrastructure “from below and within”, focusing on operation routines, control rooms, repair and maintenance, incremental improvements, “middle actors” (technicians, installers, controllers, caretakers, facility managers), disruption, practices of daily-use and socio-technical encounters. We particularly encourage prospective participants to emphasize the richness of empirical material in their presentations, exhibit visual and/or audio data, or even material objects that can form a basis for a fruitful discussion. If appropriate conditions are in place, the session will be introduced or followed up by a quick tour of the conference venue’s infrastructural backstage and a discussion with one of the building’s facility managers in order to get a concrete grasp of what energy infrastructure is, and what taking care of it actually entails.

The abstract needs to be submitted using the online form. It should not exceed 500 words, max. 5 keywords. Choose the number of the session in which your presentation should be included (Thematic field “Towards Low-Carbon Energy Systems”; session “C.7 Taking care of energy infrastructures”).

Submission deadline for abstracts is January 20, 2020.

KEYWORDS: energy infrastructure, care, operation, repair & maintenance, energy practices

CFP Society for Applied Anthropology 80th Annual Meeting, Albuquerque March 17-21, 2020

ExtrACTION and Environment TIG – CALL FOR SESSIONS, PRESENTATIONS, AND POSTERS

Society for Applied Anthropology 80th Annual Meeting

“Cultural Citizenship and Diversity in Complex Societies

The SfAA’s ExtrACTION and Environment topical interest group (TIG) welcomes organized sessions, individual papers, posters, and more* that deal with any aspect of social scientific engagement with resource extraction, environmental politics and activism, and human-environment relationships. We are delighted to include sessions you organize but can also place individually-submitted abstracts into an appropriate session.  We look forward to seeing you!

The theme for the 2020 SfAA meeting is “Cultural Citizenship and Diversity in Complex Societies.” As one of the most interesting—and most imperative—dimensions of contemporary cultural citizenship, we anticipate a stimulating set of presentations and conversations around key environmental themes.

*Beyond the usual conference papers, we welcome community studies, practical workshops, film screenings, poster presentations, theoretical and ethical analyses, poetry, plays and puppet shows, site tours, and more!

HOW TO GET INVOLVED:

OPTION 1: It’s not too late to organize a session! Take ownership of a topic and invite others to participate. You can ask people you know or send out a “call for papers” on the ExtrACTION listserv (extraction-TIG@googlegroups.com) or another relevant list. All you need is a 100-word abstract for the session. Paper authors will supply their own 100-word abstracts.

OPTION 2: Propose an individual presentation of your work. All you need is a 100-word abstract. We’ll form the actual sessions.  For those who wish to submit individual papers, there will be a button to click to indicate the TIG cluster you want to review your submission within the SfAA submission web portal. Just select ExtrACTION and Environment!

All sessions and papers should be submitted through the SfAA’s website, which can be found at https://www.appliedanthro.org/annual-meeting.  The deadline for submissions is October 15. 

EAN call for panel

The Call for Panels for the 16th EASA Biennial Conference “New anthropological horizons in and beyond Europe” has been launched.

The EASA conference will be held from 21-24 July, 2020 at the ISCTE-Lisbon University Institute and ICS-Institute of Social Sciences, University of Lisbon.

The official deadline for the call for panels is October 21, 2019. This means we need to have panel abstracts ready well in advance of this date. To have your panel listed as network-affiliated panel, it is necessary to first check with the EAN convenors and this year we will pick out of the proposals the official EAN panel and will affiliate the other selected panel. In the past, we have found network affiliated panels are more likely to be successful than individual submissions, so we’d encourage you to consider submitting an official EAN panel.

Many suggested themes of the conference are highly relevant to issues within energy research. You can find more details about the theme here.

Please send your panel suggestions to the EAN to Simone Abram simone.abram[at]durham.ac.uk Elisabeth Moolenaar emoolenaar[at]regis.edu and Nathalie Ortar nathalie.ortar[at]entpe.fr by October 6th. This will ensure we have time to make editorial suggestions as well as find collaborators for your panel suggestion (if need be). If you have any ideas but are unsure how to go about refining them into a panel abstract, by all means contact us to discuss the issue further.

Remember we are not responsible for the decisions of EASA, however we are offering advice and discussion of your panel ideas in order to strengthen the argument. This way we will also have an overview whether panels with similar topics are being proposed.

Please have a look at the conference webpage regarding panel formats, submission rules and other useful info. For those of you who haven’t submitted before. The guidelines state the following:

Submission rules:

  *   Panels should have at least two co-convenors (panel organisers) from different institutions, and ideally from different countries.

  *   At least one of the convenors must have a PhD degree.

  *   Delegates (those attending the conference) may only make one presentation each. It is allowed to be a co-author on additional papers if you are not the one presenting them. In addition, a delegate may also convene once (be that a plenary, panel, lab or roundtable) and be a discussant or a chair in one plenary session, panel, or roundtable. Roundtable participation counts as being a discussant, not a presenter.

  *   All convenors and presenters must be members of EASA (during 2020), and pay their subscription before the conference. You need not conform to this rule when making your proposal, but must address it after your proposal has been accepted.

  *   EASA requires all accepted panels to be open to paper proposals through the website: panels should not be organised as ‘closed’ sessions, although roundtables can be.

  *   When proposing an EASA network panel, please inform the network convenors of your proposal before submitting it. The network name must be appended to the title of the proposed panel. e.g. Latest research in soul kitchens [Anthropology of Food Network].

  *   All attending the conference, including panel convenors, paper presenters, discussants and chairs, will need to register and pay to attend

Selection process:

The Scientific Committee of EASA2020 will decide which proposals to accept based on:

a) compliance with ‘the rules’

b) on clarity, cohesion, reliability and academic rigour (quality) The Scientific Committee will pay attention to different anthropological traditions and topics.

  *   EASA2020 can host a maximum of 2000 delegates, which from experience suggests approximately 180 panels. This is likely to be below 50% of the number of proposals received.

  *   All proposals must be made via the online form.

  *   Proposals should consist of a panel title, a short description of <300 characters, and an abstract of 250 words.

  *   The proposal may also include the names of any chairs or discussants, although these can be added subsequently using the login environment, Cocoa. Please use the convention of Firstname Lastname (Institution). (Where convenors will take these roles, you need not re-enter their names.)

CFP: EASA Biennial Conference, July 21-24, 2020 (Lisbon)

The Energy Anthropology Network welcomes panel proposals for the EASA biennial conference of 2020.

Titled “New anthropological horizons in and beyond Europe<https://easaonline.org/conferences/easa2020/theme.shtml>”, the EASA conference will be held from 21-24 July, 2020 at the ISCTE-Lisbon University Institute and ICS-Institute of Social Sciences, University of Lisbon. EASA reminds us that its history started 30 years ago in Portugal, it’s an anniversary!

The official deadline for the call for panels is October 21, 2020. This means we need to have panel abstracts ready well in advance of this date. To have your panel listed as network-affiliated panel, it is necessary to first check with the EAN convenors and this year we will pick out of the proposals the official EAN panel and will affiliate the other selected panel. In the past, we have found network affiliated panels are more likely to be successful than individual submissions, so we’d encourage you to consider submitting an official EAN panel.

Many suggested themes of the conference are also highly relevant to issues within energy research. You can find more details about the theme here.<https://easaonline.org/conferences/easa2020/theme.shtml>

Please send your panel suggestions to the EAN to Simone, Elisabeth and Nathalie by October 6th (simone.abram@durham.ac.uk ORTAR@entpe.fr emoolenaar@regis.edu). This will ensure we have time to make editorial suggestions as well as find collaborators for your panel suggestion (if need be). If you have any ideas but are unsure how to go about refining them into a panel abstract, by all means contact us to discuss the issue further.

Remember we are not responsible for the decisions of EASA, however we are offering advice and discussion of your panel ideas in order to strengthen the argument. This way we will also have an overview whether panels with similar topics are being proposed.

Please have a look at the conference webpage<https://easaonline.org/conferences/easa2020/cfpan> regarding panel formats, submission rules and other useful info. Please note that for this conference EASA encourages a wide range of Panel formats<https://easaonline.org/conferences/easa2020/cfpan>, and we encourage you to try these out!

For those of you who haven’t submitted before. The guidelines state the following:

Submission rules:

  *   Panels should have at least two co-convenors (panel organisers) from different institutions, and ideally from different countries.

  *   At least one of the convenors must have a PhD degree.

  *   Delegates (those attending the conference) may only make one presentation each. It is allowed to be a co-author on additional papers if you are not the one presenting them. In addition, a delegate may also convene once (be that a plenary, panel, lab or roundtable) and be a discussant or a chair in one plenary session, panel, or roundtable. Roundtable participation counts as being a discussant, not a presenter.

  *   All convenors and presenters must be members of EASA (during 2020), and pay their subscription before the conference. You need not conform to this rule when making your proposal, but must address it after your proposal has been accepted.

  *   EASA requires all accepted panels to be open to paper proposals through the website: panels should not be organised as ‘closed’ sessions, although roundtables can be.

  *   When proposing an EASA network panel, please inform the network convenors of your proposal before submitting it. The network name must be appended to the title of the proposed panel. e.g. Latest research in soul kitchens [Anthropology of Food Network].

  *   All attending the conference, including panel convenors, paper presenters, discussants and chairs, will need to register and pay to attend

Selection process:

The Scientific Committee of EASA2020 will decide which proposals to accept based on:

a) compliance with ‘the rules’

b) on clarity, cohesion, reliability and academic rigour (quality) The Scientific Committee will pay attention to different anthropological traditions and topics.

  *   EASA2020 can host a maximum of 2000 delegates, which from experience suggests approximately 180 panels. This is likely to be below 50% of the number of proposals received.

  *   All proposals must be made via the online form.

  *   Proposals should consist of a panel title, a short description of <300 characters, and an abstract of 250 words.

  *   The proposal may also include the names of any chairs or discussants, although these can be added subsequently using the login environment, Cocoa. Please use the convention of Firstname Lastname (Institution). (Where convenors will take these roles, you need not re-enter their names.)

Also, feel free to use this mailing list to look for co-convenors for your panels!

Looking forward to receiving your proposals!

All the best,

Your EAN team

Energy Research & Social Science is welcoming review articles.

Recently the editor of ER&SS send out a notice that review articles are not submitted with equal consistency or persistency as the other article types.  A description of what types of articles work for ERSS:

•                     Original research articles (generally between 6,000 and 10,000 words, including references): Research articles generally do something new or novel, whether it’s to fill a research gap, address a puzzle, propose a new theory, tighten a concept, or draw from new data such as interviews or field research.

•                     Perspectives (generally 2,000 to 5,000 words): Unlike full-length research articles, Perspectives are shorter, opinion-like pieces on a recent topic of interest. They are intended to present the results of small pilot studies, introduce or critique new concepts (to the field of energy studies), commemorate an event or breakthrough, or mark something significant in current affairs.

•                     Review essays (8,000 to 12,000 words): Review articles generally do not produce new research. Instead, they scour existing peer-reviewed or even popular literature, have many references, and try to tease out major themes for those unfamiliar with a particular technology, topic, or field.

From the editor: “In that vein, if you have a good review article you were thinking of—including a critical review, interdisciplinary review, systematic review, meta-analysis, theoretical review, or even just a well-done narrative review—please do consider sending it to us. As long as it’s on the topic of energy and society—broadly interpreted to also include mobility, climate, buildings, electricity, and even water and agriculture in some contexts—we would love to consider it.”

Energy transition: Does the mountain give birth to a mouse?

5th Energy and Society Conference

Pre-Call for Workshops

Theme: “Energy transition: Does the mountain give birth to a mouse?”

8-10 September 2020, University of Trento, Italy

The fifth Energy and Society Conference and midterm conference of the European Sociological Association Research Network 12 Environment and Society will take place in Trento, Italy, from 8th to 10th September 2020.  We aim to bring together researchers interested in the social dimensions of energy, to exchange insightful ideas and create opportunities for collaboration. We invite contributions from across the social sciences and interdisciplinary research teams working on energy and society issues. The conference is organized in cooperation with ESA RN 12, ISA RN 24, and the Urban Europe Research Alliance (UERA).

With this pre-call we would like to invite proposals for workshops that will then be announced in the call for papers to be issued after the ESA conference 2019 in Manchester.

Workshops are meant to discuss a specific issue reflecting the conference theme, or the contribution of social analysis to energy research and policy. The discussion should be based on short inputs, and actively involve participants. Interactive formats are highly encouraged.

The usual call for abstracts as well as for contributions to the chosen workshops will be published in October 2019.

In your submission, please indicate the topic of the proposed workshop as well as the planned format of the workshop. Please indicate if you call for contributions from conference participants via abstracts (mentioning possible topics and formats). We will include this then in the cfp.

 Please send your proposals for workshops until the 15th of September to: energysociety[add]email.de (Pia Laborgne)

We are looking forward to many interesting contributions and fruitful exchange.

Contact for further questions:

Responsible for local organization: Natalia Magnani (University of Trento) natalia.magnani[add]unitn.it

If attending the ESA, you are invited to approach us there with your workshop ideas and questions (e.g. at the business meeting of RN 12).

SIAA Call for papers

Call for Papers for a panel on Smart City and Sustainability at the next SIAA (Italian Society for Applied Anthropology) annual meeting in Ferrara, Italy (12-14 December 2019).

TITLE: 
City 3.0 is on its way: The ‘Smart City’ model between resistance and adaptation
COORDINATORS:
Mara Benadusi, anthropologist, University of Catania, Department of Political and Social Sciences
Luca Ruggiero, geographer, University of Catania, Department of Political and Social Sciences

“Out of an experience of the cities came an experience of the future”, Raymond Williams (1975: 23)
After undergoing highly impactful and externally-driven industrialization, various areas of the world are now facing a phase of economic transition involving the smart use of energy and economic models based on “innovation” and “sustainability” to manage urban and metropolitan areas. The smart approach has spread so widely throughout the globe due not only to its extreme transferability and adaptability, but also to its ability to develop seductive imaginaries associated with 3.0 cities: technologically advanced cities densely interconnected by telematic, ecological, resilient, multi-specialized and socially inclusive networks. In essence, the widespread use of new information and communication technologies is believed to improve quality of life and meet the needs of citizens, businesses and institutions. However, the smart city model has also come under scrutiny for its ambiguity (Hollands 2008; Nam and Pardo 2011) and the risk-laden political arrangements underlying its model of local governance. Its fiercest critics argue that these geometries of power foster exclusively market-oriented development, exacerbating class differences rather than reducing them (Hollands 2008, 2015).
This panel sets off from a series of fundamental questions. Is the smart city model nothing more than a new brand of neoliberal politics aimed at concentrating resources in the production of space that ensures the accumulation and reproducibility of capital? Is it actually encouraging political choices in the direction of more inclusive, progressive and environmentally sound values? Or does it act to depoliticize policy making processes by circulating prefabricated solutions in the seemingly neutral form of “good-practice pragmatism”? It could be argued that one the hallmarks of “roving” paradigms such as the smart city model is to elude forms of local resistance, developing ideas and rhetoric with the power to aggregate collectivities even without political consensus. If true, how does this dynamic manifest in areas plagued by issues that require concrete future alternatives in sectors such as energy, the environment, and urban sustainability, specifically in terms of safety and quality of life? In short, how does the smart agenda solve the problems mentioned above and how compatible is it with the needs of the weakest segments of the urban population?
Proposed papers should show how smart solutions and tools are incorporated into the urban contexts under investigation, the effects they produce in everyday life, in the sphere of emotions and social imaginaries, and the applied repercussions of the smart model in terms of social justice and sustainability.

Bibliographic references
Hollands Robert G., 2008, Will the real smart city please stand up?, in “City”, 12(3): 303-320.
Hollands Robert G., 2015, Critical interventions into the corporate smart city, in “Cambridge Journal of Regions, Economy and Society”, 8(1): 61–77.
Nam Taewoo, Theresa A. Pardo, 2011, Conceptualizing Smart City with Dimensions of Technology, People, and Institutions, https://inta-aivn.org/images/cc/Urbanism/background%20documents/dgo_2011_smartcity.pdf
Williams Raymond, 1975, The country and the city, New York: Oxford University Press.
_______


Paper proposals can be sent by mail to mara.benadusi@unict.it. The proposal should include both an abstract (max 400 words) and a short bio (max 250 words). 

Deadline for submission on 23 July 2019.

We look forward to receive your panel ideas!

Les nouveaux territoires de l’énergie

Le secteur de l’énergie connaît depuis le début du XXè siècle de profonds bouleversements. Dans un contexte d’après pétrole et de méfiance vis-à-vis du nucléaire le basculement vers un nouveau mix énergétique fondé sur le développement des énergies renouvelables vient remettre en question bien des certitudes sociales, économiques ou industrielles. Au cœur de la transition écologique, la production d’énergie sort progressivement des grands lieux de production, centrales nucléaires ou barrages hydroélectriques pour venir bousculer les pratiques et les représentations sur des territoires jusque-là peu concernés. Forêt et bois énergie, installation collective de biomasse, ferme solaire, utilisation de l’eau ou du vent par l’implantation d’éoliennes toujours plus hautes… Le développement des énergies renouvelables fait entrer la question énergétique dans le quotidien et l’agenda des territoires provoquant des débats, des conflits, mais aussi des expériences plus consensuelles.

 Le présent appel à article vise à étudier les effets territoriaux des mutations en cours, à la fois en termes de production et de consommation. Si les questions des conflits d’usages en lien avec le déploiement des grandes installations d’ER ont donné lieu à la production d’une importante littérature, d’autres nous paraissent mériter attention. Elles constituent le cœur de cet appel. La première concerne l’étude des conséquences de l’évolution des formes d’organisation du système de production énergétique de plus en plus localisés. La seconde, les bouleversements des pratiques. La troisième porte sur les configurations d’acteurs liés à cette décentralisation.

Évolutions du système de production de l’énergie 

Le déploiement local de la production énergétique vient tout d’abord interroger la solidarité énergétique, que ce soit entre les citoyens ou entre des territoires historiquement inscrits dans des systèmes maillés symboles d’unité nationale. La multiplication des lieux de production et les premières tentatives d’autoconsommation sont une remise en cause profonde des systèmes énergétiques nationaux intégrés. À l’inverse, le développement de système autonome visant à une production et une consommation localisées peut être une chance pour des états émergents n’ayant plus à construire de grand réseau de distribution d’énergie.

La production d’énergie devient aujourd’hui aussi une question économique centrale pour certains territoires. Des espaces ruraux aux grandes centrales solaires dans les déserts de la planète, la plupart des projets s’inscrivent dans le cadre du déploiement d’une « économie verte » porteuse potentiellement de développement local : innovations (technique, institutionnelle, sociale, etc.), la création d’emplois ou la création de revenus sous forme de taxes ou de rentes foncières … Aussi la recherche d’un nouveau mix énergétique rebat les cartes des acteurs historiques et des cultures métiers. Il s’agit d’analyser les effets des évolutions technologiques et de l’arrivée de nombreux nouveaux acteurs qui s’invitent aujourd’hui dans le tête-à-tête historique entre les grands énergéticiens et les États. Les mutations amorcées dans un contexte de libéralisation de la production ont contribué à la naissance de nouveaux acteurs dans le champ de l’énergie. Acteurs économiques (groupes financiers, fonds de pension), acteurs industriels concurrents directs des producteurs historiques, acteurs technologiques à l’image de jeunes start-up ou de laboratoires de recherche reconnus, mais aussi acteurs territoriaux à l’image des collectivités locales voire des propriétaires fonciers aujourd’hui directement intéressés par la question énergétique.

Comment s’organise(nt) aujourd’hui le(s) système(s) de production énergétique(s) et selon quelle géographie ? Avec quel lien au territoire d’implantation ? L’énergie verte est-elle porteuse de développement ? Si oui dans quelle mesure ?

Évolutions des pratiques

Face aux bouleversements qui ont débuté, l’énergie est devenue une question sociale centrale. Compte tenu de son renchérissement et des contraintes techniques liées au développement de nouvelles technologies, comportements et représentations ont commencé à évoluer.

  • D’un point de vue technologique les modèles de smart city ou smart grid promettent aux consommateurs un habitat interconnecté permettant de développer des comportements collectifs certes vertueux, mais individuellement contraignants. La littérature sur la ville durable et les éco-quartier a commencé à documenter cette question, qui pourtant ne saurait concerner seulement certains territoires démonstrateurs (Espaces et sociétés 2011/4, n° 147, Quelle ville durable?).
  • Le développement des formes de précarité énergétique face au renchérissement des coûts a également fait l’objet d’enquêtes. Comment cela se traduit-il à l‘échelle territoriale. Que ce soit en termes de stratégies d’adaptation des comportements, de mesure de ces nouveaux risques sanitaires et sociaux. Assiste-t-on au déploiement de nouvelles politiques publiques afin d’en atténuer les effets ? Si oui à quelle échelle et avec quel impact sur le territoire ?
  • Les élus, les acteurs socio-économiques, les citoyens consommateurs ont-ils pris la mesure de l’ampleur des bouleversements en cours ? Les acteurs faiseurs sont-ils en capacité de comprendre et interpréter les évolutions rapides du système énergétique ?

Collectivités publiques et évolutions des cadres institutionnels  

La transition énergétique offre également un terrain fertile à des approches multiniveaux. Grandes arènes internationales de type COP, multiplication des initiatives et des annonces européennes ou nationales, développement de nouvelles filières et des installations sur les territoires, inventions de modes de régulations national/local au grès des évolutions technologiques. Il s’agit d’interroger la montée en puissance de politiques locales et l’effacement progressif tant des politiques nationales que des grands producteurs historiques dans ce nouveau modèle.

Dans ce contexte un zoom sur les collectivités locales se justifie doublement. Spatialement, ces nouvelles configurations des acteurs de l’énergie sont le plus souvent localisées et entrent en confrontation avec les modes traditionnels d’occupation de l’espace. Politiquement, parce que dans la plupart des pays les évolutions législatives et réglementaires se sont emparées de ces nouveaux enjeux pour les inscrire dans leurs politiques d’aménagement et de développement local. Dans bien des États les lois les plus récentes ont progressivement obligé les collectivités à s’accaparer cette question de l’énergie. C’est bien ce que montre l’exemple français. Que ce soit à l’échelle de l’urbanisme opérationnel (chauffages urbains, bâtiments basse consommation), à des documents de planification (desserte urbaine et bilan carbone des Plans locaux d’urbanisme, Schémas de cohérence territoriale, Grenelles, réglementation des nouveaux usages) ou celle de la planification stratégique (SRADDET régional, PCET départementaux…) les collectivités sont depuis peu devenues à leur tour des acteurs majeurs de l’énergie.

L’objectif de ce dossier est de nourrir les débats sur les effets de la décentralisation de l’énergie sur les territoires induite par le développement des ER, et réciproquement la manière dont les acteurs de ce dernier s’en saisissent et la mettent en œuvre à leur échelle. Sont bienvenus les articles proposant des analyses de cas en Europe et dans le monde. Des articles portant sur les questions de conflits d’usages liés aux grandes installations d’ER pourront être pris en compte, à condition qu’ils en proposent une relecture au regard du présent appel.

Coordination du dossier

Jérôme Dubois, Leïla Kebir

Calendrier

Envoi des articles au plus tard le 15 septembre 2019

Adresse pour la correspondance exclusivement en version électronique par courriel à : leila.kebir@unil.ch j.dubois.iar@wanadoo.fr

Les auteurs qui s’interrogent sur la pertinence de leur proposition peuvent contacter les coordinateurs

Attention:

La revue ne demande pas de propositions d’articles, mais directement les articles.

Les articles ne dépassent pas 42 000 signes (espaces compris) en incluant: texte, notes, références bibliographiques, annexes, mais hors résumés.

Les conseils aux auteurs figurent dans chaque numéro. Les normes de présentation et les conseils aux auteurs sont disponibles sur le site de la revue : http://www.espacesetsocietes.msh-paris.fr/soumission-darticles-et-consignes-aux-auteurs/#articlesl

La revue rappelle que tout auteur peut lui adresser, à tout moment, un article en hors dossier, si celui-ci concerne le rapport espaces, territoires et populations

au sens large et s’il respecte les normes de publication; en cas d’acceptation, ces articles sont publiés rapidement.

Energy and Environmental Justice: A Multidisciplinary Workshop @ Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona 21-22 October 2019

Invitation for papers that explore the justice implications of energy systems, energy infrastructures and energy cultures/practices. The workshop will gather contributions studying inequalities in how energy is produced, distributed and consumed around the world. We are particularly interested in work that engages with environmental justice (EJ) scholarship and activism; resistance and social movements; ethnographic methods; and critical EJ perspectives. A core goal is to develop new strategies for identifying and counteracting energy- and climate-related injustices.
 
The expansion and modification of energy systems are inextricably linked to justice concerns and climate change. Much ‘energy justice’ literature, however, glosses over its relation with EJ research and practice. As such, critical insights are missed for studying energy issues in relation to systemic marginalisation, the uneven socioecological impacts of different modes of production, and disparities in the recognition of diverse voices and livelihoods. Re-centering EJ scholarship and activism within multidisciplinary energy research, this workshop is an opportunity to collaboratively develop critical approaches to energy and environmental justice. We encourage submissions that explore decolonial, emancipatory, or transformative approaches to energy and justice; political ontology and pluriverse thinking; transition design and praxis; and diverse community responses to imposed social and environmental change. Recognising the importance of direct action, particularly around sites of resource extraction and extractivism, we also invite work on collective action strategies and issues of autonomy, intersectionality, and responsibility.
 
The workshop will host 15 participants across 5 panel sessions, public lectures from two keynote speakers, and a closing plenary to discuss future research strategies and collaborations. The goal is to publish an edited volume with a leading press featuring a selection of workshop contributions. Extended abstracts will be pre-circulated to participants three weeks before the workshop.
 
Interested participants should send an abstract (300 words) and a short bio (100 words) with contact details to event conveners, Tristan Partridge (Tristan.Partridge@uab.cat) and Sofía Avila (acalerosofia@gmail.com) by 1 July 2019. Participants will be notified of acceptance by 9 July 2019. There may be limited funding available to support travel and accommodation costs for some participants; please let us know if you would like to apply for this support. We also hope to support participation via videoconference for those unable or unwilling to fly.

Mémoire et énergie – Socio-anthropologie 42

Date limite de réception des propositions d’articles : 15 septembre 2019

Argumentaire

Le numéro propose d’étudier les liens spécifiques et rarement évoqués entre la mémoire et l’énergie. L’énergie, comme concept moderne issu de la science thermodynamique, désigne tous les phénomènes et matériaux susceptibles d’opérer la modification de l’état un système. Dans les sociétés, elle se matérialise par un ensemble de convertisseurs, objets techniques qui transforment ces puissances d’agir en énergie utilisable à des fins précises. Par ce qu’il désigne, ce concept englobe donc un ensemble de réalités humaines qui prend une place centrale dans les sociétés contemporaines essentiellement productivistes où il a été forgé. L’ensemble des convertisseurs énergétiques laisse des empreintes multiples et y induit une certaine présence du passé, de même que, façonnant l’appréhension du monde, il forge des rapports particuliers au temps.

D’un point de vue spatial, les systèmes énergétiques industriels (charbonnier, électrique, pétrolier, gazier…), issus d’un processus de déploiement mondial démarré en Europe au tournant du xixe siècle1, maillent de vastes territoires de la planète. Les empreintes d’anciens systèmes sont visibles dans le paysage (installations abandonnées : vestiges de moulins hydrauliques ou à vent, de hauts fourneaux, anciennes mines de charbon ou d’uranium…), et dans l’organisation des territoires, qu’ils structurent et contraignent. Ils marquent aussi les corps (atteintes à la santé des activités industrielles), les environnements (réchauffement climatique, pollutions persistantes, destruction des milieux…), les imaginaires (caractère « traditionnel » des moulins à vent, accidents nucléaires…).

Par ailleurs, les systèmes énergétiques imposent des temporalités qui s’harmonisent plus ou moins avec les temporalités humaines. Associée à la science thermodynamique, l’économie fossile s’est construite sur un temps universel, homogène et vide, opposée au temps vécu qui se souvient (Bergson, 2013). De la machine à vapeur aux réseaux électriques « intelligents », l’« ethos énergétique » engendre une certaine manière d’être au monde, où tous les phénomènes capturés comme ressources sont mis en équivalence (Vidalou, 2017), et où l’usager passif reçoit en abondance une énergie délocalisée avec constance, sécurité, souplesse dans le rêve d’une économie immatérielle et sans surprise (Dubey, de Jouvancourt, 2018). L’industrie nucléaire contraint les sociétés humaines à composer avec des temporalités qui leur sont incommensurables, de la gestion des déchets à celle des catastrophes dont les marques ouvrent l’avenir à une impensable infinité. De ce fait, nécessitant de nouveaux « régimes d’appréhension du réel » (Houdart, 2017), l’atome déborde la mémoire du présent et, déjà, celle du futur. L’avenir continue cependant de guider les politiques énergétiques contemporaines, dont l’innovation reste le maître mot.

Ainsi, mémoire et énergie s’entrecroisent. D’abord, parce que les systèmes énergétiques, inscrits plus ou moins dans la longue durée, occupent une place structurante dans l’espace et le temps vécus. Deuxièmement, en raison des temporalités inhérentes aux phénomènes et matériaux intégrés à ces systèmes, qui sont multiples et hétérogènes, plus ou moins conciliables avec les temporalités humaines. Enfin, les techniques de l’énergie sont particulièrement soumises à l’injonction à l’innovation dans les sociétés industrialisées, et l’innovation convoque elle-même la mémoire car la nouveauté se construit en rupture avec de l’ancien2.

Ce lien entre la mémoire et l’énergie mérite d’être questionné en tant que tel. Pointer des lieux surchargés de mémoire, d’autres abandonnés, analyser la manière dont les systèmes énergétiques mobilisent et façonnent la mémoire, permet d’ouvrir le passé, mais aussi l’avenir énergétiques à d’autres possibles, d’autres images que celles qui dominent les discours et les imaginaires.

Le numéro de Socio-anthopologie propose d’étudier les liens entre la mémoire et l’énergie au prisme de trois entrées :

  1. « traces, absences et trous de mémoire » : analyse des lieux (et non-lieux) de mémoire de l’énergie dans les corps, les environnements, les imaginaires ;
  2. « systèmes énergétiques et temporalités » : influence des systèmes énergétiques sur la construction des temporalités sociales ;
  3. « tradition, modernité et changement technique » : construction de généalogies, de ruptures, disparitions et réapparitions d’usages, de projets, d’événements dans les représentations des systèmes énergétiques passés.

Il fait appel à des approches anthropologiques, historiques, philosophiques, sociologiques, géographiques.

(1) Traces, absences et trous de mémoires

La mémoire en tant que « souvenir d’événements vécus par soi-même, ses ancêtres, ou les personnes de son groupe » (Joutard, 2010, p. 783) procède d’absences et d’oublis. Les traces des systèmes énergétiques, plus ou moins conscientisées en tant que telles, peuvent être indésirables et intempestives (pollutions, problèmes de santé), performatives (mémoires de luttes, objets de patrimoine participant d’identités territoriales), et se manifestent dans l’organisation spatiale, dans les environnements et les corps, ainsi que dans l’imaginaire. Ainsi, certaines traces des systèmes énergétiques sont peu ou non pensées en tant que telles. L’inertie3 d’anciennes structures énergétiques s’exerce encore sur l’organisation spatiale des sociétés actuelles et leur identification et leur analyse offrent une meilleure compréhension de la structure actuelle des territoires (Robert, 2003). Lorsqu’elles sont délétères, la permanence des traces pose des problèmes spécifiques aux sociétés et forment un rappel intempestif des activités passées. Elles induisent, comme les déchets, une « expérience de la confrontation à certains fantômes des sociétés contemporaines » (Montsaingeon, 2016). L’extraction minière, le traitement et l’exploitation de combustibles et matériaux (charbon, pétrole, terres rares, matières fissiles et radioactives), inhérents au fonctionnement des systèmes énergétiques contemporains, engendrent des déchets et des pollutions durables. L’oubli et l’ignorance sont parfois organisés. Des « stratégies d’opacité statistiques » ont été mises en place en France durant les décennies d’après-guerre par les acteurs des houillères pour dissimuler la responsabilité de l’industrie charbonnière dans la maladie de la silicose (Rosental et Devinck, 2007). Certains acteurs empêchent la reconnaissance des atteintes au corps causées par l’activité nucléaire (Hecht, 2013). À la Hague, « le nucléaire sécrète l’oubli » et un malaise ordinaire face au risque du nucléaire, engendre des « trous de mémoire » chez les habitants et travailleurs (Zonabend, 1989). À Tchernobyl, à Fukushima, la difficulté à appréhender des phénomènes hors de portée de la sensibilité humaine facilite la négation du risque, encouragée par les pouvoirs publics (Lemarchand 2008 ; Houdart 2017). Une conséquence de cette absence mémorielle est l’occultation de responsabilités dans les processus de production de ces traces, mais aussi l’oubli de leur nécessaire existence dans certains projets politiques disposant d’une image écologique positive tels que la transition énergétique (Brier, Desquesnes, 2018).

Ce premier axe propose la mise en évidence de traces laissées par les systèmes énergétiques et l’analyse de la place qu’elles occupent dans la mémoire et de la manière dont elles la mobilisent.

(2) Systèmes énergétiques et temporalités

Les modes de conversion de l’énergie forment une médiation entre les sociétés et les puissances d’agir non humaines. En cela, ils façonnent la perception du monde et le rapport au temps des sociétés, et contribuent à la composition du monde social comme ensemble de plurivers associés malgré leur hétérogénéité (Martin, 2010). Dans les sociétés non industrielles, l’usage des convertisseurs est rythmé sur les multiples temporalités cosmiques inhérentes aux phénomènes convertis. À l’inverse, les systèmes énergétiques contemporains et leur « ethos énergétique » homogénéisent tous les phénomènes capturés comme ressource. Des exemples emblématiques en sont les data centers, qui mobilisent de l’énergie pour le stockage d’informations, ou le système électrique et ses convertisseurs qui fondent un usage constant de l’énergie (techniques de stockage, de transport et de gestion des flux). Ils imposent des temporalités parfois inconciliables avec les temporalités humaines. Paradoxalement, ces temporalités induisent un détachement des réalités concrètes et contribuent à l’amnésie quotidienne quant à leur existence, alors même qu’elles imposent à la postérité une remémoration éternelle. La temporalité longue de certains phénomènes (réchauffement climatique, radioactivité), la puissance et la régularité comme critères de performance, basés sur un temps mécanique et sans mémoire (Bergson, 2013 ; Dubey, de Jouvancourt, 2018), et sur l’emploi de combustibles issus de centaines de millions d’années de vie sur terre, contribuent à la généralisation du « présentisme », à savoir l’étalement du présent et l’effacement du passé et du futur (Hartog, 2003). Par ailleurs, les systèmes énergétiques modèlent l’espace qu’ils aplanissent (Vidalou, 2017) de manière parfois brutale en bouleversant des modes de vie et leurs rapports singuliers au monde, qu’il s’agisse d’aménagement du territoire ou d’accidents industriels. En Amazonie, la connexion aux réseaux électriques efface les usages alimentaires traditionnels (article du numéro 39 de Socio-anthropologie). Les temporalités de l’atome imposent un effort de conservation des connaissances, formelles mais aussi tacites, sur les structures et le fonctionnement de l’industrie nucléaire, dans un futur qui s’étale à l’infini (Grandazzi, 2006).

Ce deuxième axe étudie les questions posées à la mémoire par les temporalités propres des systèmes énergétiques dans leur articulation avec les temporalités humaines (passé, présent, futur). Il se base sur l’étude de techniques de l’énergie, sur l’analyse des conflits de perception du monde dans des projets d’innovation passés ou présents. L’analyse concernera également des usages de l’énergie non occidentaux/non industriels, étrangers à l’ethos énergétique, et les rapports aux temporalités qui les fondent et qu’ils alimentent.

(3) Tradition, modernité et changement technique

L’énergie étant érigée en impératif civilisationnel (Zachmann, 2013), la mémoire nourrit des images de modernité et de tradition, de progrès et d’archaïsme, dans les discours sur les convertisseurs énergétiques. Le « retour à la bougie », partie intégrante de la rhétorique des acteurs du Plan Messmer dans les années 1970 (Chartier, 2015), hante toujours l’imaginaire des opposants à une décroissance énergétique. La muséification peut contribuer à précipiter dans le passé certains usages toujours en cours mais considérés comme désuets, tels les moulins à vent ou à marées au début du xxe siècle (Marrec, 2018), mais aussi à minimiser ou à neutraliser des conflits sociaux ou des risques environnementaux. À Longwy, les anciens sites sidérurgiques défendus au cours de violents conflits par les ouvrier·e·s et leurs familles dans les années 1980 sont transformés en terrains de golf pour de riches touristes et les derniers hauts fourneaux figurent maintenant un passé révolu et distrayant. Tchernobyl est devenu un site de dark tourism pour des visiteurs curieux et avides de sensations fortes. À l’inverse, les innovateurs convoquent des images familières pour promouvoir l’usage de convertisseurs ou des opérations d’extraction industrielle de ressources en énergie. Les acteurs actuels du « bois-énergie » valorisent l’aspect traditionnel de ce combustible en masquant la démesure consommatrice de leurs projets ainsi que la présence d’habitant·e·s. Ceux-ci mobilisent à leur tour la mémoire de l’occupation des lieux, et revendiquent la richesse des liens qu’ils tissent avec la forêt pour s’opposer à son exploitation industrielle (Vidalou, 2017). Les protagonistes des éoliennes terrestres et offshore construisent des généalogies entre des machines puissantes connectées au réseau électrique et les moulins à vent traditionnels pour évoquer la tradition et la familiarité4.

Lorsqu’elle traite l’énergie, l’histoire elle-même est tributaire de certains aspects du paradigme énergétique et de ses valeurs. De multiples récits historiques donnent une place centrale à l’énergie et contribuent à façonner l’imaginaire des convertisseurs du passé, du présent et du futur. La lecture par les bilans, quantitative, procède à une mise en équivalence de nombreux phénomènes et matériaux hétérogènes (Fressoz, 2013), eux-mêmes « mis en ressource » par une opération de conversion d’abord virtuelle. Elle produit des récits qui ont pour effet de surexposer certains objets au détriment d’autres, ou de les déformer au point d’en donner une perception étroite. De nombreux projets d’exploitation des énergies renouvelables au xxe siècle sont absents de la mémoire collective, contribuant à conférer un aspect de nouveauté factice à la dynamique actuelle et à négliger des cas riches d’enseignements.

Cet axe s’intéresse au dualisme archaïsme/modernité dans la manière de considérer l’énergie des sociétés contemporaines. Il étudie l’imaginaire de la modernité énergétique, par l’étude des discours et récits de l’histoire de l’énergie, avec ses figures et ses lignées récurrentes, mais aussi leur transformation au cours de l’histoire. Il examine également l’utilisation de ce dualisme et son appel à la mémoire dans la mise en place de projets techno-politiques.

Modalités de soumission

Une intention argumentée d’environ 5 000 signes est attendue au pour le 15 septembre 2019 au plus tard aux deux coordinatrices Anaël Marrec et Sarah Claire (anael.marrec [at] univ-nantes.fr ; sarah.claire [at] ehess.fr).

Les contributeurs et contributrices seront sélectionné·e·s au 1er novembre 2019. Les articles seront attendus pour mars 2020 dans l’optique d’une publication en septembre 2020.

La parution du numéro 42 « Mémoire et énergie » aura lieu en novembre 2020.

CFP: Histories of Flexibility

Accueil*CALL FOR PAPERS*

Histories of Flexibility

 

Special Issue

Journal of Energy History / Revue d’histoire de l’énergie (JEHRHE)

 

Co-Editors:

Peter Forman (Lancaster University)

Stanley Blue (Lancaster University)

Elizabeth Shove (Lancaster University)

 

Description:

Over the last five years, flexibility has emerged as a key topic in academic, industry and policy debates concerning the decarbonization of contemporary energy systems (IEA, 2008; Goutte and Vassilopoulos, 2019; Ofgem, 2017;Martinot, 2016; Powells et al. 2014). These conversations have primarily developed around the challenge of maintaining the synchrony between energy supply and demand whilst also reducing the carbon intensity of energy networks. Widespread decarbonization is seen to require substantial investment in renewable resources such as wind, solar and tidal power, yet these resources are each characterised by distinct rhythms of generation (day and night cycles, tide timetables) that do not necessarily align with the times when energy is needed. 

Researchers are consequently investigating ways in which the flexibility of energy systems can be increased, with flexibility typically being seen as a system’s ability to “respond rapidly to large fluctuations in demand and supply, both scheduled and unforeseen variations and events, ramping down production when demand decreases, and upwards when it increases” (IEA, 2008: 14). It is in this context that there is growing interest in the flex-abilitiesof different aspects of energy systems, including the potential for generators to quickly deliver energy when needed; for businesses and organisations to shed or reduce their consumption at specific moments; or for residential consumers to reduce peak load by changing the timing of energy-demanding practices.

However, across the energy sector, issues of flexibility are routinely presented as contemporary challenges linked to novel imperatives of decarbonisation and renewable supply. Practically no attention has been paid to the ways in which past energy systems have been variously (in)flexible, to earlier efforts to manage the relation between supply and demand, or to how such strategies reproduce specific assumptions about ‘normality’ and normal service in different societies and historical periods. As such, there is little sense of how understandings of flexibility have developed and of how they have been built into the design and operation of energy systems over time. 

We are consequently inviting contributions for a special issue of the Journal of Energy History on the ‘Histories of Flexibility’. We believe that contemporary debates about flexibility could and should be informed by understandings of how temporal and spatial relations between supply and demand have been configured in the past, and of the processes and politics involved. We therefore invite articles that contribute to an understanding of how supply-demand relations have been managed historically and that, in one way or another, inspire and inform contemporary debates. Whilst most attention to date has focused on flexibility in the context of the electricity sector (partly because electricity is difficult to store), we invite contributions that go beyond this context, suggesting that there is potentially much to learn about how supply-demand relations have been organised and managed in relation to other fuels (coal, gas, oil). We are also interested in accounts that detail the different forms of social and institutional flexibility associated with different ‘end uses’ (for instance, heating, automobility), across different sectors. There are no specific limits with regards to time period. 

Specific topics that might be explored in more depth include:

  • Issues of aggregation and scale and how these relate to the challenges of managing supply-demand relations – including the move from smaller scale to networked grids.
  • Responses to instances of ‘shortage’ or crises in supply – what do these reveal about diverse forms of flexibility, about notions of normality and about the periods in which they occur?  As well as moments of breakdown, such as power cuts there are other revealing forms of restriction, for instance in war times or times of economic crisis.
  • Methods of handing variations over different time scales: for instance, seasonal fluctuations as well as daily peak loads.
  • How changes in societal and institutional rhythms, e.g. working hours, holiday periods, etc. have a bearing on both the ‘need’ for energy and when it is required.
  • Methods and techniques for recording and representing the relation between supply and demand in real time, and for forecasting future needs.
  • The political and institutional organisation of energy systems, and how these constitute pressures for and interests in different forms of flexibility. 

Details:

To have your paper considered for this special issue, please send an abstract of no more than 300 words to Peter Forman at p.forman@lancaster.ac.uk, by June 7th 2019. Abstracts will be reviewed by the co-editors and authors will notified of the success of their applications by June 20th 2019.

We have funding from CREDS (Centre for Research into Energy Demand Solutions) to host and organise a two-day workshop for contributors (scheduled for December 2019).  This event will provide an opportunity to revise, comment on and improve the coherence of the draft articles and ensure that the special issue adds up to more than the sum of its parts.

Timeline:

 

 

7th June 2019

  Deadline for abstract submission

20th June 2019

  Selection of authors

10th November  2019

  Deadline for first paper drafts

18th December 2019

  Workshop to review and discuss papers (funded by CREDS)

January – May 2020

  Editing submissions

28th August 2020

  Final deadline for submission to ‘The Journal of Energy History’

 

 

 

The Journal:

The Journal of Energy History / Revue d’histoire de l’énergie is the first journal in French- or English-speaking academia dedicated to the study of the history of energy. At the heart of human history, concerns about energy have increasingly become global, complex, and pressing. They merit rigorous investigation and study, including historical inquiry. Furthermore, the history of energy helps us understand the history of human society and sheds light on contemporary challenges. 

The Journal of Energy History / Revue d’histoire de l’énergie seeks to go beyond studies that treat different sources and forms of energy in isolation. The journal hopes to create new opportunities for scholarship and publication in which the full potential of historical research can be realized by comparing and contrasting different forms of energy produced and consumed in their social, political, economic, technological, and cultural contexts.

CFP: NAWEA/WindTech 2019 Conference (deadline extended May 1, 2019)

This is a reminder about abstracts for NAWEA/WindTech 2019 Conference, which will be held October 14-16, 2019 at the University of Massachusetts Amherst.

Abstracts for papers and posters are due 1 May.  

This conference joins the symposium of the North American Wind Energy Academy (NAWEA) and the International Conference on Future Technologies in Wind Energy (WindTech). This combined event is inspired by and envisioned as North America’s counterpart to European Academy of Wind Energy’s exciting Science of Making Torque from the Wind and Wind Energy Sciences Conferences. The theme of NAWEA/WindTech 2019 is the Grand Vision of Wind Energy. The focus will be on research topics relevant to the next generation of wind energy technologies which will help facilitate the wind supplying a large fraction of the world’s energy supply.

This conference is being undertaken in association with the National Renewable Energy Laboratory and in collaboration with the European Academy of Wind Energy

A number of side events and a field trip (on October 17) are also planned.

Details, including for the submission of abstracts, may be found at www.naweawindech2019.org

Anthropology in a time of climate change: theoretical questions, productive problems

Call for Papers: AAA/CASCA Annual Meeting 2019

Organizers: Julianne Yip, Adam Fleischmann

 

Climate change produces problems for anthropology. Like other global phenomena, its scale is both difficult to comprehend and challenging for the immediate methods of anthropology. Insofar as climate change is anthropogenic (human-made), humans–or, rather, certain forms of human existence–have become a geological force at the planetary level. How can humans, as anthropology ethave claimed, be both cultural beings (more-than-mere-nature) bound to place, yet a global geological force of “nature”? Anthropologists have begun to consider the demands climate change makes with regard to our grounding concepts, politics, methodologies, and how we understand ourselves and our discipline. This panel gathers these conversations to reflect on the theoretical questions climate change poses for anthropology.

Climate change is a productive problem. We cannot experience global climate change in itself, only its effects, mediated. Further, global anthropogenic climate change is only knowable through a vast assemblage of people, practices, processes, things and institutions. How does this shape the sites and methods of anthropological research? To what extent does climate change render visible the organizing principles of our discipline? How does it provoke us to question the epistemic figures of culture (nature), society, the subject, agency, the human/Man, time, history, etc.? These questions are also relevant in light of the unequally and inequitably distributed causes and effects of climate change across time and space. How do theoretical problems raised by climate change situate anthropologists vis-a-vis their relationships with interlocutors, other ethical or political commitments, or anthropology’s historical, colonial origins?

We encourage submissions that explore how climate change challenges (or not) the discipline’s theoretical assumptions in your research.

 

Please send 250-word abstracts and titles to the organizers,

adam.fleischmann@mail.mcgill.ca and jcyip@mit.edu, by 27 March 2019.

 

Cfp: Energies and Technologies Futures

EASA – FAN/EAN joint workshop

20-21st June 2019 in Lyon (France)

Deadline for abstract submission: April 15th 2019

For over a century, predictions about the future have been dominated by technological fantasies, either with utopian or dystopian outcomes. Driven increasingly by responses to the causes and effects of climate change, popular political future imaginaries span elitist extra planetary survivalism and back-to-the-land minimalism. Anthropologists have emphasised the social and material forms of technology, and the need to analyse and account for visions of the future and attend to socio-material relations between technologies, humans and other living beings in a shared environment.

FAN explores the anthropological potential for future-oriented methodologies, while EAN generates knowledge on approaches energetic practices of various kinds. This workshop brings these two concerns together, to generate synergies, theoretical trajectories and newly shared research agendas. Where do energy and technology futures intersect? How are human futures implicated in diverse techno-energetic visions? What alternative other human futures are possible in the current techno-energetic world than those extremes delineated above of extraplanetary survivalism and back-to-the-land minimalism? How can anthropologists account for- and intervene- and take part in forging in futures-generation?

The aim is to demonstrate that two relatively new areas of anthropological research and practice can work together to consolidate an agenda for research and intervention. It seeks to both impact on the theory and methodology of the discipline and to advance an anthropological approach to energy futures in an interdisciplinary research field.

Deadline for abstract submission: April 15th 2019

Abstracts (in English) with a maximum length of 500 words should be downloaded on the workshop website https://etechfutures.sciencesconf.org

Notifications of acceptance will be communicated by May 1st 2019.

Full papers (in English with a maximum length of 8,000 words including notes and references) will be due by May 30th, 2019.

Fees: The workshop is free of charge, and a limited amount of funding is available to support travel expenses. If you need to request support for travel please contact the organisers regarding this when submitting your abstract.

Organizing and scientific committee:

Pr. Simone Abram, Durham University

Dr. Débora Lanzeni, DLRC Aarhus University

Dr. Nathalie Ortar, LAET, ENTPE-University of Lyon

Pr. Sarah Pink, Monash University

Dr. Karen Waltorp, Aarhus University