Energies and technologies futures program

June 20/21st 2019

ISH, Salle Élise Rivet (4th floor)

14 avenue Berthelot, 69007 Lyon, France

 

9.30 Introduction

10.00 – 12.00 panel one

Sarah Pink – Emerging Technologies Lab, Monash University

Energy Futures and Emerging Technologies: A Design Anthropological Approach

Alexander R.E. Taylor – Department of Social Anthropology/University of Cambridge

Future-proof Clouds: Electromagnetic Pulse Protection in the Data Centre Industry

Julia Velkova  – Consumer Society Research Centre/University of Helsinki

Replacing fossil fuels with data: emergent cultures and infrastructural politics around data centres’ thermal waste across Europe

Agnese Cimdina – Faculty of Business, Management and Economics University of Latvia

Is technology the answer to the double bind?

12.00 – 13.00 lunch

 

13.00 – 15.00 panel two

Katherine Ellsworth-Krebs – University of Saint Andrews

Energy demanding expectations: house size, privacy and domestic energy research

Michiel Köhne & Elisabet Rasch – Sociology of Development and Change/Wageningen University        

The future of energy in your rented home – Tenants and the energy transition

Charlotte Johnson – UCL Energy Institute, UCL

Is Demand Side Response a woman’s work? Domestic labour and the UK’s future smart electricity system

15.00 – 18.00 site visit of Lyon Confluences

 

Day two

09.00 – 11.30 panel three

Chiara Bresciani – The Cairns Institute, James Cook University & School of Culture and Society, Aarhus University

Under a rising sun? Solar energy, bright prospects and missed futures

Hsin-yi Lu – Department of Anthropology, National Taiwan University

Wind Futures: Contested Sociotechnical Imaginaries of Renewable Energy in Taiwan

Martín Fonck – Rachel Carson Center for Environment and Society/Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München

“Explorando el interior de la Cordillera de Los Andes”: an ethnographic approach to the construction of geothermal energy futures in the Chilean Andes Mountains.

Ragnhild Freng Dale –

Between power lines and petroleum: energy futures, art interventions and coloniality in the Norwegian north

11.30 – 11.45 coffee break

 

11.45 – 13.00 Discussion on publication possibilities and panel proposals for EASA 2020

 

13.00 – lunch and departure

 

Attendance is free but please register: https://etechfutures.sciencesconf.org/

   

ENERGISE FINAL CONFERENCE – October 15th (Barcelona)

Social and cultural change is a key ingredient in successful energy transitions. Societal norms and routines with regard to work, education, family life, consumption and recreation greatly determine our patterns of energy use as well as our ability and willingness to change those patterns. Without a comprehensive understanding of these practice cultures, efforts to reduce energy use and carbon emissions at the individual or household levels are unlikely to deliver the long-term impacts necessary for a sustainable transformation.

At the final conference of the ENERGISE project, researchers will share new insights into social and cultural influences on energy use across different levels of society. Speakers will draw on almost three-years of cutting edge research that uses a ‘Living Labs’ approach to directly observe existing practice cultures related to energy use in a real-world setting, and to test both household and community-level initiatives to reduce energy use. Participants in the conference will discuss the impact of European energy consumption reduction initiatives, and explore the use of Living Lab approaches for researching and transforming patterns of sustainable consumption. Attention will also be given to new theoretical approaches to evaluate energy initiatives, with a particular focus on social practices and cultures. Lessons and insights for policy will be presented in relation to the advancement of the European Energy Union.

The ENERGISE final conference is open to all interested parties, and will actively encourage positive interaction between actors from society, academia, the policy arena and industry. ENERGISE is funded under the EU H2020 programme (Grant No 727647).

The event will be held in conjunction with the European Roundtable on Sustainable Consumption and Production ERSCP 2019 conference, which takes place from 15-18 October 2019.

Energy Policy Research Conference 2019

9th Annual ENERGY POLICY RESEARCH CONFERENCE

Energy Decision-Making in Times of Disruptive Change
 
September 29th – October 1st, 2019 – Boise, Idaho
Hosted by the Energy Policy Institute

For more information:

EPRC 2019

Registration now open: Powering the Planet- Why the world needs Anthropologists

To register to the event and workshops click HERE.

 

For full programme click HERE.

 

Why the World Needs Anthropologists: Powering the Planet

28-29 October 2017. Durham, UK

The fifth edition of the annual symposium “Why the World Needs Anthropologists” will take place this year in Durham, 28-29 October. The event will explore how energy professionals and anthropologists can cooperate to design and deploy energy innovations that alter the world for the better. Energy is an indispensable part of our domestic and working lives. We thus need to develop smart and sustainable energy systems that are environmentally responsible and people-friendly.

Be inspired by top speakers.

Improve your skills during thematic workshops.

Visit exhibition stands at the Energy Hotspot and meet new people.

 

Keynote speakers:

  • BENJ SYKES (UK Country Manager and Head of Programme Asset Management in DONG Energy’s Offshore Wind Power)
  • TANJA WINTHER (Associate Professor at Centre for Development and the Environment, University of Oslo)
  • SOPHIE BOULY DE LESDAIN (Expert Researcher at Electricité de France (EDF))
  • VERONICA STRANG (Executive Director of the Institute of Advanced Study, Durham University)

 

Registration for this free event will open on 1 September 2017. However, you can subscribe now at www.applied-anthropology.com and follow updates also on Facebook: www.facebook.com/events/1292845360803687

ENERGY HOTSPOTs

During the day, our co-organisers, sponsors and partners will present at the Energy Hotspot. Do not miss the opportunity to mingle with enthusiasts from all sorts of different domains in academia, energy industry and non-for-profit sector.

WORKSHOPS

Accounting for Energy (Energethics)
The roles of corporations in aiming for a sustainable future, and how anthropological insights help asking the right questions.

Ethno-Engineering (LCEDN)
How to work appropriately with technical practice innovations in culturing skills for renewable energy.

Insightful Jobs (ASA Apply)
Demonstrating the Value of Reflexive Thinking.

Mining History (Durham Energy Institute)
A walking tour of Durham featuring its hidden history as the centre of what was once the largest coalfield in England.

 

LCEDN Annual Conference 2017: Equity and Energy Justice (11-12 Sept, Durham)

The Low Carbon Energy for Development Network is pleased to invite you to our Annual Conference 2017, which will be held at Durham University on the 11th and 12th of September 2017. The theme for this year’s conference is “Equity and Energy Justice“.

Speakers include Dr Rosie Day (University of Birmingham), Professor Benjamin Sovacool (University of Sussex), Dr Vanesa Castan Broto (University College London) , Professor Joy Clancy (University of Twente) and Simon Trace (former CEO at Practical Action).Working within the broad framework of the UN’s policy of promoting Sustainable Energy for All (SE4ALL) the conference is based on the principle that without equity of access and energy justice, there can be no sustainability, and the conference aims to further understandings of how equity and justice are essential components of sustainability.Issues we are hoping to address include (but are not limited to):

  • Inclusivity/marginalization
  • Technology justice
  • Climate justice
  • Intersectional and structural inequalities
  • Governance and citizenship
  • Contestation
  • Socio-technical imaginaries and normative projects for social change
  • Research collaborations

This year’s annual conference (our 6th) is the first during the new phase of funding under DFID’s Transforming Energy Access programme. In this, the LCEDN has a role in consolidating existing relationships and collaborations among relevant UK academics and researchers, policy communities, NGOs and the private sector, and is extending partnerships in the global south for skills development. This conference is an opportunity to network, learn and develop partnerships across sectors.

The full programme is available HERE.

Registration for the conference is open until the deadline of Thursday 7th September at 13:00 GMT – please register here.

 

Conference: “Beyond Oil”, Bergen, Oct 25-27, 2017.

The next “Beyond Oil” conference will be held in Bergen, Oct 25-27, 2017.

Society is inevitably moving beyond oil. The direction that this transformation will take is still highly uncertain. Transformations to societies beyond oil involve deliberate choices that lead to different outcomes with regards to power, justice, inequality and human-nature relations. A task for social scientists is to analyze the structures of inertia and capacities for change in current societies, and highlight the multiple futures that these make possible.

As research moves from studying problems to proposing pathways and solutions, we therefore need to critically interrogate the particular solutions that are proposed and how they relate to the futures we wish to mobilize. As academics, we also need to consider our own role in transformations – whether as catalysts, participants, critics, or knowledge producers. We welcome researchers from a variety of research fields connected to the topics above.

 

See the detailed program here.

 

Other information

Dates and venue

Oct 25–27, 2017 in Bergen, Norway

Litteraturhuset in Bergen, Østre Skostredet 5-7

 

Accomodation

For accommodation, there are a number of nearby hotels. For example Scandic ByparkenHotel Park and Grand Terminus. There are also budget options in Bergen, like P-Hotels or Marken Guesthouse.

 

https://spacelab.b.uib.no/conference-beyond-oil/ 

 

Contact

karin.lillevold@uib.no

Photography exhibition – Through the Lens: Energy Access Stories of Solar Home System Users in Rwanda

Through the Lens: Energy Access Stories of Solar Home System Users in Rwanda.

A photography exhibition (by Iwona Bisaga (UCL))

This project aims to give voice to those relying on off-grid solar systems for electricity by engaging with end-users and households through a series of energy mapping discussions and participatory photography. 20 households have taken part, taking photos and sharing their stories of getting access to energy, energy needs and aspirations, and what energy access means to them, whether they live off the grid in remote, rural areas, or closer to the existing infrastructure.

There are very few ways in which rural communities’ voices on gaining access to basic services such as energy can be heard and this project allows to bridge that gap. Each photo tells a story and each story reveals a different aspect of energy access realities in a country where over 70% of the population still live off the grid.
Through the Lens builds on Iwona Bisaga’s PhD research focusing on the users of off-grid Solar Home Systems in Rwanda which she is conducting in collaboration with BBOXX. It has been funded by UCL Public Engagement Unit Beacon Bursary.

When? Opening night on May 5th at 6:30pm. Exhibition will stay open to public until June 3rd 2017.

 

More info on the Facebook page

Why the World Needs Anthropologists: Powering the Planet – 28-29 October 2017. Durham, UK

Why the World Needs Anthropologists: Powering the Planet

28-29 October 2017. Durham, UK

The fifth edition of the annual symposium “Why the World Needs Anthropologists” will take place this year in Durham, 28-29 October. The event will explore how energy professionals and anthropologists can cooperate to design and deploy energy innovations that alter the world for the better. Energy is an indispensable part of our domestic and working lives. We thus need to develop smart and sustainable energy systems that are environmentally responsible and people-friendly.

Be inspired by top speakers.

Improve your skills during thematic workshops.

Visit exhibition stands at the Energy Hotspot and meet new people.

 

Keynote speakers:

  • BENJ SYKES (UK Country Manager and Head of Programme Asset Management in DONG Energy’s Offshore Wind Power)
  • TANJA WINTHER (Associate Professor at Centre for Development and the Environment, University of Oslo)
  • SOPHIE BOULY DE LESDAIN (Expert Researcher at Electricité de France (EDF))
  • VERONICA STRANG (Executive Director of the Institute of Advanced Study, Durham University)

 

Registration for this free event will open on 1 September 2017. However, you can subscribe now at www.applied-anthropology.com and follow updates also on Facebook: www.facebook.com/events/1292845360803687

ENERGY HOTSPOTs

During the day, our co-organisers, sponsors and partners will present at the Energy Hotspot. Do not miss the opportunity to mingle with enthusiasts from all sorts of different domains in academia, energy industry and non-for-profit sector.

WORKSHOPS

Accounting for Energy (Energethics)
The roles of corporations in aiming for a sustainable future, and how anthropological insights help asking the right questions.

Ethno-Engineering (LCEDN)
How to work appropriately with technical practice innovations in culturing skills for renewable energy.

Insightful Jobs (ASA Apply)
Demonstrating the Value of Reflexive Thinking.

Mining History (Durham Energy Institute)
A walking tour of Durham featuring its hidden history as the centre of what was once the largest coalfield in England.

 


PAST EVENTS – Why the world needs anthropologists
TartuWhy the world needs anthropologists 2016: Humanise IT!
4-5 November, 2016, Tartu, Estonia
Keynote speakers: Sten Tamkivi (Teleport), Dimitris Dalakoglou (VU Amsterdam), Melissa Cefkin (Nissan), and Daniel Miller (UCL)

 

Why the world needs anthropologists III: Burning issues of our hot planet Why the world needs anthropologists 2015: Burning issues of our hot planet
27 November 2015, Ljubljana, Slovenia
Keynote speakers: Lučka Kajfež Bogataj (University of Ljubljana), Genevieve Bell (Intel), Thomas Hylland Eriksen (University of Oslo), Joana Breidenbach (Betterplace.org)a

 

WhyII Why the world needs anthropologists 2014: Coming out of the ivory tower
5 December 2014, Padua, Italy
Keynote speakers: Antonio Luigi Palmisano (University of Salento), Rikke Ulk (Antropologerne), Michele Visciòla (Experientia)

 

Why the world needs anthropologists IWhy the world needs anthropologists 2013: New fields for applied anthropology in Europe
29 November 2013, Amsterdam, the Netherlands
Keynote speakers: Anna Kirah (Making Waves), Jitske Kramer (HumanDimensions), Simon Roberts (Stripe Partners)

 

More info : https://www.easaonline.org/networks/app_anth/events.shtml#

 

Durham Energy Seminar: Energy and Homes (Dr Roxana Morosanu)

Energy, Science & Society

  

DEI Seminar Series

 

// Energy and Homes: Conflicts, Contradictions and Collaborations

 

Dr Roxana Morosanu, Research Associate, University of Cambridge

13.00-14.00, Wednesday 24 May 2017

Room D210, Dawson Building, Durham University

 

Intersections between domesticity and energy infrastructures are at once evident and confusing.  They are evident because the vast majority of domestic buildings are visibly connected to the national energy grid. They are mysterious because how and why people use energy in their homes is, in many ways, an incommensurable question.

 

This paper discusses findings from, and reflects upon practices of interdisciplinary collaboration within a wider research project that looked at domestic energy demand of UK households.  It focuses, specifically, on the role of contradictions as entry points, both ethnographically and in advancing cross-disciplinary communication.

 

Dr Roxana Morosanu is a Research Associate at the University of Cambridge.  As part of the IdEAS project, her work involves using ethnographic, arts-based, and participant-led methods to look at creativity and fixation in design from a social anthropological perspective.  Her PhD research was part of a wider interdisciplinary project looking at domestic energy demand of UK families, and that brought together researchers from building engineering, design and social sciences.  Her most recent publications include An Ethnography of Household Energy Demand in the UK (Palgrave Macmillan 2016).

Nuclear Accident Compensation Schemes. Have we calculated the true costs of nuclear energy?

Cornell University’s Mario Einaudi Center for International Studies and Meridian 180 are pleased to invite you to an expert briefing on nuclear accident compensation schemes, taking place on Friday 19 May 2017; 02:00 – 03:30PM in Brussels’ Steigenberger Hotel.

As the EU works towards a more sustainable energy landscape in the face of climate change, the role of nuclear energy is again the subject of debate – from discussions about France’s heavy dependence on nuclear energy production to Germany’s decision to phase out nuclear power by 2022. Countries around the world are looking to nuclear as part of their plan to reduce carbon emissions. But nuclear power carries very high risks, as catastrophic accidents have already demonstrated.

Six years after the meltdown at Fukushima, Cornell University’s Mario Einaudi Center for International Studies and Meridian 180 bring top experts from the U.S. and Japan to Brussels to discuss current practices and necessary reforms in the fields of nuclear safety and risk preparedness.

The event will launch the Einaudi Center’s comparative study of U.S., Soviet/post-Soviet, and Japanese nuclear accident compensation schemes, which assesses the previously hidden costs of nuclear energy that have been exposed by the accidents at Three Mile Island, Chernobyl, and Fukushima.

· Speakers ·

  • Annelise Riles, Jack G. Clarke Professor of Far East Legal Studies & Professor of Anthropology, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York, US
  • Takao Suami, Professor of Law, Waseda University, Tokyo, Japan
  • Rebecca Slayton, Assistant Professor, Science & Technology Studies & Judith Reppy Institute for Peace and Conflict Studies, Cornell University
  • Sonja Schmid, Associate Professor, Science and Technology Studies, Virginia Tech, Falls Church, Virginia, United States
  • Mary X. Mitchell, Postdoctoral Fellow, Atkinson Center for a Sustainable Future, Cornell University

· Briefing Synopsis ·

The event will offer policy-makers, NGOs, scholars, scientists, and interested members of the general public an international and comparative assessment of liability and public compensation schemes in the nuclear field. It presents the work of a global working group of experts convened by Meridian 180, a multilingual platform for policy solutions, and the Mario Einaudi Center for International Studies at Cornell University. Covering experiences with diverse technologies, governance strategies, and accident scenarios in the United States, the USSR/post-USSR, Europe, and Japan, the expert participants will outline the challenges that nuclear accidents have posed for affected people and communities as well as for the financing of the nuclear industry worldwide. 

Questions? Contact chm72@cornell.edu I +1-917-763-6499

Extractive Seeing: On the Visual Culture of Oil

Centre for Visual Arts and Culture

Public Lecture by Professor Janet Stewart “Extractive Seeing: On the Visual Culture of Oil”


7th March 2017, 18:00, Room 405, Business School, Durham University

Centre for Visual Arts and Culture (CVAC) Annual Lecture on Environments and Visual Culture. Professor Janet Stewart, Head of School in Modern Languages and Cultures will deliver this public lecture.

This paper is part of a larger research project, Curating Europe’s Oil, which sets out to investigate the role that archives (of different kinds) and museums have in constructing and potentially deconstructing existing narratives about fossil fuels that make possible particular behaviours and responses, while closing down or erasing others. It considers the role that oil plays in twenty-first century cultural memory in Europe, investigating how Europe’s oil history is being archived, narrated and displayed in key cultural institutions, showing how an understanding of the processes through which the experience of ‘living with oil’ in Europe has been catalogued, controlled and challenged are invaluable in imagining new narratives of possible energy futures. This paper explores one aspect of the larger project, arguing that a particular way of seeing, linked to the 20th century’s dependence on fossil fuels, in general, and oil, in particular, comes to dominate in the construction of the visual record of Europe’s oil dependencies, and in the way in which that visual record is interpreted. The paper introduces the concept of ‘extractive seeing’, and employs it to frame an investigation of the visual culture of oil in Austria, a country not often immediately associated with Europe’s oil history.

Click here for more information.

Contact janet.c.stewart@durham.ac.uk for more information about this event.