New book on the Coal Rush

Hot of the press with Cambridge University Press: https://www.cambridge.org/de/academic/subjects/earth-and-environmental-science/environmental-policy-economics-and-law/beyond-coal-rush-turning-point-global-energy-and-climate-policy?format=HB 

Climate change makes fossil fuels unburnable, yet global coal production has almost doubled over the last 20 years. This book explores how the world can stop mining coal – the most prolific source of greenhouse gas emissions. It documents efforts at halting coal production, focusing specifically on how campaigners are trying to stop coal mining in India, Germany, and Australia. Through in-depth comparative ethnography, it shows how local people are fighting to save their homes, livelihoods, and environments, creating new constituencies and alliances for the transition from fossil fuels. The book relates these struggles to conflicts between global climate policy and the national coal-industrial complex. With coal’s meaning transformed from an important asset to a threat, and the coal industry declining, it charts reasons for continuing coal dependence, and how this can be overcome. It will provide a source of inspiration for energy transition for researchers in environment, sustainability, and politics, as well as policymakers.

Post-petro imaginaries online event December 3, 2020 at 6 PM – 7:30 PM EST

The 1014 project space has been transformed into a hyper-reality testing environment. It is populated with experiential futures prototypes that investigate our relationships in a spectrum of post-oil scenarios. Through narrative techniques and design futures methods a design studio at CUNY Citytech led by participatory futures practitioner Chris Woebken and cultural researcher Alexander Klose has developed a series of bespoke design interventions and immersive installations throughout our Upper East Side townhouse project space.Join this virtual roundtable with experts Heather Davis (Eugene Lang College, The New School), Elizabeth Henaff (NYU IDM), Timothy Furstnau (Museum Of Capitalism) and Karen Pinkus (Cornell University, Atkinson Center for a Sustainable Future, Ithaca), delve into these precarious scenarios, discuss and respond to new values, myths, and cultural imaginations that might emerge while being shaped by the afterlives of petro-modernity.This project is produced in collaboration between Alexander Klose, cultural researcher, Office for Precarious Concepts and Undisciplinary Research, Berlin, Germany and member of the research collective Beauty of Oil, Berlin/Vienna, and Chris Woebken, artist and participatory futures practitioner and co-founder of the Extrapolation Factory, Adjunct Assistant Prof. at CUNY City Tech and 2020 Faculty Fellow at the New School’s Urban Systems Lab, New York City, USA.Special thanks to the Urban Systems Lab at The New School for their support in developing research for the project.

To join: https://zoom.us/webinar/register/1816052921898/WN_zpog1KK4SFavGDbYpLTGAg